Category: Citadel astrogranite vs astrogranite debris

30.10.2020 By Vorr

Citadel astrogranite vs astrogranite debris

citadel astrogranite vs astrogranite debris

Chaos Black Spray is designed for basecoating plastic, resin and metal Citadel miniatures. Reformulated for maximum results, with a fantastic black Apply over light colours for an eye-catching glowing appearancePerfect for weapons, engines, warpstone or magic effectsWater-based formulaPot size Citadel Base paints are high quality acrylic paints specially formulated for basecoating your Citadel miniatures quickly and easily.

They are desig Reformulated for maximum results, smooth This small brush S Baseideal for basecoating features a blend of synthetic and sable bristles, and holds a fine point allowing you to reach tho Signup to the AirsoftEire. Empire Theme by Pixel Union. Powered by Shopify. View cart. Home Astrogranite Debris Click or scroll to zoom.

Tap or pinch to zoom. Astrogranite Debris by Citadel. Citadel Technical paint is designed to provide a swift, effective solution to detailing your bases.

One pot contains 24ml of paint. Chaos Black Spray Citadel. View full details. Tesseract Glow Citadel. Abaddon Black Citadel. Grey Seer Spray Citadel. Base Brush Small Citadel. You recently viewed Clear recently viewed. Subscribe Signup to the AirsoftEire. Email address. Sign Up. Added to your cart:.This message was edited 2 times. Forum Index. Forum adverts like this one are shown to any user who is not logged in. Join us by filling out a tiny 3 field form and you will get your own, free, dakka user account which gives a good range of benefits to you: No adverts like this in the forums anymore.

Times and dates in your local timezone. Full tracking of what you have read so you can skip to your first unread post, easily see what has changed since you last logged in, and easily see what is new at a glance. Email notifications for threads you want to watch closely. Being a part of the oldest wargaming community on the net. If you are already a member then feel free to login now. Once its dry, what do people do to add depth etc to the base of this texture colour.

Pittsburgh, PA. Personally, I tend to give it a few washes, for example one of Nuln Oil all over, then one or two of Agrax Earthshade in a few selective patches. It helps add a bit of interest to the base. Then yeah, a light drybrush when that's all dry. Florence, KY. It would seem that stupidity is as eternal as war.

If you don't have the collection of dry paints, an alternative to longbeard grey is pallid wych flesh, which is a very useful "lighter than grey but slightly tinted and not quite white" color. Personally, after astrograninte I would wash nuhln, and before that dries, add a few splashes of agrax in random, "lower" spots -- this makes it a lot less uniform, and gives it more depth. No need to clean off the brush, just let it muddy in all together. Then drybrush hard with administratum grey, and then selectively or lightly drybrush with pallid wych flesh.

I've been giving mine a liberal wash of Agrax, followed by a very light drybrush of Ceramite White, looks pretty good inky opinion. Thanks eveyone for the tips, going to have to go check my paint collection and see what I got. Dakka 5. Member List. Recent Topics. Top Rated Topics.

Forum Tools Forum Tools Search. Highlights GW astrogranite texture paint. Subject: Advert. New Ork Player. A wash of Nuln Oil and a drybrush of a lighter color. Talys Fixture of Dakka. Any flat grey seems to work well.Games Workshop updated their line of texture paint, adding among other two products: Astrogranite and Astrogranite Debris that may be useful for simulating imperial architecture.

Let's see how they compare to other products I used The Astrogranite is not literally new, just repackaged into a larger pot. It is the fine one and has a texture of sand mixed with a normal paint, as used historically in modelling. You can almost spread it with a brush, a spatula is recommended though.

Note, that I wouldn't use the thin spatula sold by GW but rather a wider one easily available from DIY stores or even a strip of cardboard.

It has the consistency of crystallised honey and produces interesting, large lumps. You can see the results above. Both of the Astrogranite paints are OK and I'll have fun using what's left in the pots.

However, frankly, you can use free sand for the same effect. Who I would recommend them to? The people who enjoy GW modelling tools. Or just have very little time for the hobby and the fact that they get the sand mixed already in the right proportions is worth it for them.

You can compare this with other texturing methods I reviewed and decide which one suits you best for a given project. See the pictures as separate pages: Citadel Astrogranite texture paints paste. Are the new texture paints from GW good at simulating concrete and craters?

Citadel Astrogranite texture paints paste. The thin one to the left and the "Debris" to the right. This is how this compares to the traditional way of doing this, like painted sand: Bronze Gryphons Space Marines Librarian. Emulating concrete and rock: texture paste vs. You may also find these interesting: How to paint freehand standards - for non-artistic types. Having beautiful banners custom made for your units elevates your army to the next level.Games Workshop updated their line of texture paint, adding among other two products: Astrogranite and Astrogranite Debris that may be useful for simulating imperial architecture.

Review and comparison of GW Citadel Texture/Technical Paints

Let's see how they compare to other products I used The Astrogranite is not literally new, just repackaged into a larger pot. It is the fine one and has a texture of sand mixed with a normal paint, as used historically in modelling. You can almost spread it with a brush, a spatula is recommended though. Note, that I wouldn't use the thin spatula sold by GW but rather a wider one easily available from DIY stores or even a strip of cardboard.

It has the consistency of crystallised honey and produces interesting, large lumps. You can see the results above. Both of the Astrogranite paints are OK and I'll have fun using what's left in the pots.

New Citadel Texture Paints Review

However, frankly, you can use free sand for the same effect. Who I would recommend them to? The people who enjoy GW modelling tools.

Or just have very little time for the hobby and the fact that they get the sand mixed already in the right proportions is worth it for them.

You can compare this with other texturing methods I reviewed and decide which one suits you best for a given project. See the pictures as separate pages: Citadel Astrogranite texture paints paste. Are the new texture paints from GW good at simulating concrete and craters? Citadel Astrogranite texture paints paste. The thin one to the left and the "Debris" to the right. This is how this compares to the traditional way of doing this, like painted sand: Bronze Gryphons Space Marines Librarian.

Emulating concrete and rock: texture paste vs.

Are the new texture paints from GW good at simulating concrete and craters?

You may also find these interesting: Bunkers Mk. My original imperial bunkers from early s oozing dark technology with pipes and gubbinz are fun but sometimes you want a more streamlined design. I came up with a bunker modification that allows building a lot of them in a batch. Useful not only for wargaming but also crafting projects for kids. How to build terrain Khaiell. Reviews Khaiell. On our YouTube channel Games Workshop released a new card stock terrain piece!Forum Index.

Forum adverts like this one are shown to any user who is not logged in. Join us by filling out a tiny 3 field form and you will get your own, free, dakka user account which gives a good range of benefits to you: No adverts like this in the forums anymore.

Times and dates in your local timezone. Full tracking of what you have read so you can skip to your first unread post, easily see what has changed since you last logged in, and easily see what is new at a glance. Email notifications for threads you want to watch closely.

Being a part of the oldest wargaming community on the net. If you are already a member then feel free to login now. Denver, Colorado. So, I was talking to a GW store owner about this, but I was wondering if anyone had any experience - what is the difference between the GW texture paints that are the same color?

Anyone know the difference between them? Are there any substantial ones? I just picked up a texture paint today and at the store there was a sample of bases painted with the different textures. Example is Armageddon Dust is standard texture. Armageddon Dunes is larger "pieces" of texture that are more pronounced. Same with the others, like Astrogranite vs Astrogranite Debris.

Florence, KY. It would seem that stupidity is as eternal as war. Dakka 5.

Citadel Technical: Astrogranite Debris

Member List. Recent Topics. Top Rated Topics. Forum Tools Forum Tools Search. Difference between GW texture paints. Subject: Advert. Vaxx Cultist of Nurgle with Open Sores. Ah, thanks. I hadn't noticed that PDF.By: Author Peter Thuborg. Basing your miniatures can be hard work.

Sometimes after painting up a beautiful model, I find myself wanting to skip doing the bases or not really wanting to put any effort into it. After painting almost my whole life, I know now that skipping the bases is a major mistake. One of the tricks you can use to do fast but good looking bases is by using the GW texture paints, and in this article, I will show you exactly how each will look when used.

I will review the 11 different Citadel Texture paints sold by Games Workshop. You will see two versions pr. Games Workshops Citadel texture paints are a special brand of paint that is very unlike the normal acrylic paint they sell.

The texture will provide a quick base for miniature models and is a substitute for the normal process of using flock, cork or other basing materials. The paints are mainly used for basing your miniatures but can also be used on a model if you know what you are doing. Games Workshop currently sells 11 different texture paints. Most will just provide a nice texture and colour to the base, while others will make a cool crackle or snow effect.

You can find all of the texture paints here. All of the colours are the same with the same name. It looks like a black crackle effect.

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This site also participates in other affiliate programs and is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies. Read more about our affiliate links here. For each different texture paint, I have tried to provide pictures that accurately display what it is you are getting from the paint. I have done no highlighting or any tricks that will make it look better. I have tried to take pictures that as accurately as possible will portray the colour and texture you will get.

I use the following pictures for each texture paint:. A picture of the paint after it has dried completely. In all examples, I make two versions using the same texture paint. On the first version, I apply a lot of texture to make a thick version.

On the second version, I apply as little texture as possible, while still covering the base in its entirety to make a thin version. A top-down version and an angled picture of each paint. You might notice a small difference in colour between the top-down version and the angled version.

The shots of the top-down versions are taken in an indoor setting with an artificial light source. This is probably how it will look on most tabletops. The angled version is taken indoor but close to a big window with a natural light source.Basing is a critical part of the painting process. Armies on the battlefields of the 41st Millennium or the Mortal Realms will find themselves fighting across a wide variety of terrain, from lush jungles to barren rockscapes, industrial wastelands to agrarian fields.

Your basing helps tell the story of your army — where are they fighting and why? In the spin-off How to Base Everything series, we look at different methods for basing your miniatures, so that you can locate them in time and space.

citadel astrogranite vs astrogranite debris

I recently got it in my head to make some lava bases for a new army — cooled bits of stone over hot molten magma. While poking around the internet on how to make them look good I noted a recent ish Citadel Technical paint — Mordant Earth. See, this hobby stuff can be educational! Credit: J. Griggs, USGS. When using other Citadel Technical paints like Agrellan Earth in the past my go-to strategy was to paint the base a darkish color, cover that with a layer of PVA glue, then slop on the Technical like chopped liver on a cracker, and let the whole thing dry overnight.

The usual result was a nice, wide set of cracks in the material. But when I applied this approach with Mordant Earth I found the PVA itself and the layer of paint under it also pulled apart leaving the primed base or maybe the milky PVA underneath exposed.

I wondered at first if the white I was seeing was the base material of the Mordant Earth somehow separated from the pigment, but no, the paint itself had pulled apart. I was able to peel off the toppings from the base and this is what it looked like underneath — you can definitely see where the red paint retracted leaving chunks of white showing through.

Weird, and kind of gross. In addition, I thought the surface of the dried Mordant Earth was just too smooth and shiny for what I had in mind. It looked frankly like a hard chocolate coating which just made me need to get some ice cream while I pondered what I was going to do next. Same principle I suppose and a good place to start. And should the PVA be above or below the paint? I broke down a number of test scenarios and set about to see what would look best. Sample 3, slathered with Martian Ironcrust.

Sample 10, with just blobs of Astrogranite Debris. Subjects 8 and 9, and to a much lesser degree 5, showed the same weird results as my first batch with the paint separating and white streaks showing underneath.

The common element in those three samples is PVA — 8 and 9 had a layer under the paint, 5 only on top of the paint.

citadel astrogranite vs astrogranite debris

But 2 and 7 also had PVA on top of the paint. The upshot here is that I should just avoid using PVA under my base coat of paint and probably under any of the Citadel crackle texture paints, which is what Warhammer TV told you to do in the first place. And the fragments in some of the cases 5 and 7, to a lesser degree 4 and 6 are very small, which makes standing a figure on them fairly difficult unless it is straddling multiple fragments — not out of the question but not exactly what I was looking for.

The size of the fragments in the Martian Ironcrust is more what I was hoping for. Painted with some Eshin Grey that would probably look very good. It shrinks up a bit as well, although certainly not as much as the Mordant Earth so I would need to increase the coverage if this is the approach I choose. Another variable to consider, another round of samples!